20+ People Honestly Showed What Their Jobs Are Really Like

It’s impossible to argue with the fact that all jobs are important. We see people specialize in different things every day. They could be doctors, school teachers, cashiers, or cleaners. All jobs contain things that outsiders have no idea about.

We at Bright Side have found Internet users of different professions that revealed the invisible side of their jobs. And in the bonus section, you’ll find a tweet about the difficulties that shop assistants have to deal with.

“My sister works in a photo center and this is who she was asked to take a picture of.”

This is the hand of a doctor after removing his medical gloves after 10 hours of being on the clock.

“A group of teenagers came in just to trash the theater. I was one of the people that had to clean it.”

“I work in the Arctic and Antarctic and find it much more convenient to wear my watch on a lanyard than on my wrist because of all of the layers I wear.”

“This watch has been to Antarctica countless times and to the geographic North Pole 12 times.”

“Be nice to your trash man when it’s raining and it’s 30 degrees outside. We’re not invincible. This is my hand after working 4 hours in bad weather.”

“I work at a hotel these days and went to see if a room was mislabeled as dirty. This is what I found.”

“I kept my hotel key cards from my first year working for the airlines.”

“Working hard as a truck driver has its advantages: the views!”

“My mom works at Amazon and she sent me a photo of one of the trucks she loaded.”

“I work at a call center. Whenever I get a particularly rude caller, I like to draw what they might look like. Here’s Lorraine from today.”

“I work in a fast-food restaurant, and this is our broom. My boss says it’s too expensive to replace it, yet he drives a Lincoln.”

“I work in the film industry and I’m usually too shy to ask for a picture with an actor, but I had to get one with this little guy.”

“Every staple I removed in one year at my boring office job”

“I work in a −25°F freezer every day.”

“I work at a cat shelter. These are the ’can we keep him?’ photos I sent to my partner. It worked.”

“My job involves putting labels on boxes. I hold them with my left hand and put them on the box with my right. This is what my ’clean’ hands look like.”

“I got transferred to a new location at work. This is my new break ’room.’”

You can work anywhere if you’re a programmer.

“I work as a professional princess on weekends. My kitty insists on inspecting each costume for detail accuracy.”

“I work at a hotel — a guest left this when they checked out.”

So, I work in a movie theater. ’Family of the Year’ award goes to these guys!”

“I’m a seaman. We live alone in these rooms. Depending on your position, the room can be better and bigger. This is mine.”

“I have my own toilet and shower.”

“Took this photo yesterday at work. Thought I’d share it with you guys.”

They blocked off the road after realizing what this elephant was carrying with its trunk

Deep within the animal realm, among the verdant forests and huge savannas, lives a unique species that goes by the name of elephant. Scientists and environmentalists have long been fascinated by these gentle giants. After years of intensive study and close observation, we now know that elephants have a profound emotional range and a grieving process that is remarkably comparable to our own.

George Wittemyer is a committed conservation biologist from Colorado State University who has spent a large amount of his professional life researching elephants. He once gave National Geographic a glimpse into his observations, illuminating the complex and mysterious mechanisms by which these majestic creatures deal with the death of a fellow herd member.

“Elephants have respect for their dead,” Wittemyer stated, “but their interaction with their dead is not something we fully understand.” Researchers have been intrigued by this mysterious part of their behaviour, which shows that when these animals experience the loss of one of their own, they react from deep-seated emotions.

Recently, Twitter user Parveen Kaswan released a video that revealed this fascinating discovery, underscoring the depth of elephants’ emotional intelligence and their distinct grieving process. The film shows a scenario on a peaceful road where all of the traffic has stopped and people are staring at an incredible sight.

A magnificent herd of elephants is crossing the street with a grace that is appropriate for their size and harmony. One elephant in particular sticks out in the parade, softly holding something in its trunk. Viewers, intrigued, quickly discover that the elephant is bearing a young, dead elephant calf, which is inert.

The herd stops quite solemnly, and the elephant carrying the small load carefully lays the dead calf on the ground. The others assemble around, creating a circle of respect. This scenario is quite moving; it conveys a sense of shared sadness and mourning.

The title of the video, as Parveen Kaswan so eloquently put it, “The family just don’t want to leave the baby.” Their behaviour is reminiscent of the solemn cortege of a deceased person.

The elephants continue to amaze and astound researchers and viewers alike with their level of emotional depth as they exhibit an instinctive reverence for the deceased and an understanding of the great grief they have experienced.

As they go on their trek, a second elephant comes up and tenderly cradles the dead calf in its trunk. Elephant herds are emotionally connected to one another, and this display of deep grieving and solidarity emphasises how capable elephants are of feeling loss and sadness.

This will move you !! Funeral procession of the weeping elephants carrying dead body of the child elephant. The family just don’t want to leave the baby.

The film serves as a moving reminder of the extraordinarily emotional lives that elephants lead and is evidence of the strong bonds that exist among animals. It’s a tale that connects our worlds and serves as a moving reminder of the intricacy and beauty of nature. Please spread the word about this post on Facebook to your loved ones so that others can also be moved by the moving scenes shown in the film.

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